Robert Johns | 03 Apr, 2024
Fact checked by Jim Markus

How To Build A Rock, Paper, Scissors Game Using JavaScript

Want to know how to build a rock-paper-scissors game using JavaScript? In this tutorial, I’ll walk you through this fun and practical JavaScript project step-by-step. 

Whether you’re just starting your web development journey or are keen to learn JavaScript, a JavaScript rock-paper-scissors game is a fun project for beginners to learn real-world JavaScript skills.

In this JavaScript tutorial, you’ll:

  • Craft a sleek and engaging user interface for a rock-paper-scissors game.
  • Implement core functionalities with JavaScript, including player choice handling, computer choice generation, and determining round winners.
  • Dynamically update the game interface in response to player interactions, showing current selections, scores, and round results.
  • Enhance the gameplay experience with additional features like score tracking and round management to create a structured and competitive game session.

To make the most of this tutorial, it helps to have basic web development skills, including familiarity with HTML and CSS. 

Some previous experience with JavaScript, such as manipulating HTML DOM elements and handling events, can also be helpful. However, you don't need to be a JavaScript pro or have prior experience with JavaScript rock-paper-scissors games.

I’ve also provided the full source code for this JavaScript project so you can follow along, experiment, and even build upon it for your own projects. 

Plus, you can follow along with me using our online JavaScript compiler, so you don't need an IDE to code this JavaScript project from scratch.

Let’s dive in and start building!

How To Build A Rock, Paper, Scissors Game Using JavaScript

Are you excited to dive into JavaScript web development with a fun JavaScript project

Great, because today we're going to build a rock-paper-scissors game using JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. 

This project is perfect for JavaScript beginners or newcomers to web development, as it’s a creative way to learn how these three parts of modern web development work together to create interactive web applications.

At the core of our project, JavaScript will play a pivotal role. It's the engine under the hood that manages the game logic, user inputs, and dynamic updates to the content, bringing our rock-paper-scissors game to life.

I always like to think that JavaScript acts as the brain, adding functionality and interactivity to the structural foundation provided by HTML and the stylistic enhancements of CSS.

But functionality isn't where we stop. We'll also make sure our game looks great with CSS skills that add a layer of style and design finesse to our game interface.

Take a look at the image I’ve included below to see what you’re going to be building!

Create your own interactive JavaScript rock, paper, scissors game

Wondering about the difficulty? Don’t worry! 

I’ve designed this JavaScript project to be beginner-friendly, with straightforward and easy-to-follow steps.

Whether you're just starting in web development or have some HTML and CSS experience but are new to JavaScript, this project will bolster your skills and confidence.

So, let's gear up, switch on our favorite web development IDE, and get ready to create our very own rock-paper-scissors game using JavaScript. 

By the end of this tutorial, you'll have a functional rock-paper-scissors game to add to your portfolio and a deeper understanding of how JavaScript, HTML, and CSS collaborate to create dynamic and interactive web applications. 

Let's get started and create something fun, practical, and impressive!

Project Prerequisites

Before we dive deep into creating our rock-paper-scissors game using JavaScript, let's review the JavaScript knowledge and skills you'll need to follow along. 

And remember, you don't need to be a JavaScript expert to start this project, but having a grasp of the basics will make the process smoother and more enjoyable.

Plus, if you're rusty in any of these areas, you can always brush up with a JavaScript course

Remember, we’re also here to help, so don’t hesitate to search hackr.io for help as you go along.

A Touch of HTML 

HTML is the backbone of any website, similar to a building's framework. You should be comfortable with fundamental HTML elements like <div> and <button>, along with the general structure of an HTML document. 

If you've ever created a simple webpage or played around with HTML at school or on a web development course, you're good to go!

Basic CSS Skills 

CSS is our tool for styling and enhancing the visual appeal of our web pages. It's like the interior design of our HTML structure. 

For this quiz app, you should be familiar with basic CSS styling techniques – think colors, fonts, and layout techniques like flexbox. 

If you've enjoyed experimenting with colors or arranging content on a page, you have the CSS skills needed for this project.

JavaScript Fundamentals 

JavaScript brings our quiz app to life, and while you don't need to be a JavaScript guru, you should understand fundamentals like variables, functions, conditionals, and event handling. 

If terms like function, event listener, or conditional statement sound familiar, you're ready to go! A quick review of a JavaScript cheat sheet might also be helpful for a refresher.

A Curious and Experimental Mind 

This might be the most crucial prerequisite! 

I really believe that when it comes to coding in JavaScript, the most effective way to learn is through hands-on experience, making errors, and trying again. 

Be prepared to experiment, modify the code, and perhaps even cause a few glitches (which you'll then resolve). 

That's the essence of learning and development!

You could also consider using an AI coding assistant like GitHub Copilot to help out, but I’d recommend waiting until you’re 100% stuck, as this is where you really learn.

Step 1: Setting Up The Project

Alright! Let's get started by setting up our project. This step is all about laying the groundwork for our JavaScript rock-paper-scissors game. 

If you want to dive straight in, I'd recommend following along with me using our online JavaScript compiler. This is pre-populated with the HTML, CSS, and JavaScript files you need to build this JavaScript project without switching on an IDE.

Alternatively, I've outlined the steps for you to create the necessary files and organize your workspace on your own computer. Just follow these, and you'll have a solid foundation for your project.

i. Create a Project Folder

First things first, let's keep things tidy. Create a new folder on your computer where you'll store all the files for this project. You can name it something like rock-paper-scissors-game.

ii. Initialize Your Files

Inside your project folder, you're going to create three essential files:

  • index.html: This will be the main HTML file for your project.
  • style.css: This CSS file will hold all your styling rules to make your game look great.
  • script.js: Here's where the magic happens – your JavaScript code goes in this file.

You can create these files using a code editor like VSCode and Sublime Text, or even a text editor like Notepad. Just make sure to save them with the correct extensions.

iii. Link Your CSS and JavaScript Files

Once you've created these files, you need to link them together. Open your index.html file and add the following lines of code inside the <head> tag for the CSS:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css">

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And right before the closing </body> tag, add this line for the JavaScript:

<script src="script.js"></script>

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These lines tell your HTML file where to find the JavaScript file and the CSS so you can incorporate them into your webpage.

iv. Open Your Project in a Browser

Now, let's see what we've got. Open your index.html file in a web browser. 

You won't see much yet – a blank page – but that's about to change. If the page opens without any errors, you're all set!

v. Ready Your Tools

As you work through the next steps, keep your code editor and web browser open side by side. This will allow you to make changes to your code and immediately see the results in the browser.

And there you have it! You've successfully set up your project, and you're ready to dive into the exciting part. 

Let's move on to Step 2, where we'll start crafting the HTML structure.

Step 2: Building The Game Structure With HTML

With our rock-paper-scissors project ready to go, it's time to dive into the HTML structure.

i. Start with Basic HTML Structure

Open your index.html file, and let's start by setting up the basic structure of an HTML document. For those needing a brief reminder, here's the general layout:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
  <meta charset="UTF-8">
  <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
  <title>Rock-Paper-Scissors Game</title>
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css">
</head>
<body>
  <!-- Rock-Paper-Scissors game will be built here -->
  <script src="script.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

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This structure forms the backbone for all HTML projects, including the DOCTYPE declaration, HTML tag, head section (with meta tags, title, and CSS link), and the body where our content lives.

ii. Adding the Game Component

Inside the <body> tag, let's construct the components for our Quiz App. Here's a straightforward way to organize it:

<div id="rps-game">
  <h1>Rock-Paper-Scissors</h1>
  <div id="choices">
      <button id="rock">Rock</button>
      <button id="paper">Paper</button>
      <button id="scissors">Scissors</button>
  </div>
  <div id="result">
      <!-- Result will be displayed here -->
  </div>
</div>

Try It Yourself »

In this structure:

  • We have a main container <div> with the ID rps-game.
  • A heading <h1> announces our game.
  • A <div> with the ID choices contains three buttons: Rock, Paper, and Scissors, representing the player's possible choices.
  • Another <div> with the ID result is reserved for displaying the game's outcome.

iii. Checking Your Work

After saving your changes, open or refresh your web page. 

At this stage, you might not see elaborate styling, but the basic game elements (heading and choice buttons) should be visible. 

This ensures there are no errors in your HTML structure so far.

iv. Understanding the HTML Structure

The <div>, <button>, and <h1> elements are utilized here to create a structured and interactive interface for the Rock-Paper-Scissors game. 

Each element plays a role in the game's functionality and user interaction.

v. Tips on HTML Best Practices

While focusing on functionality, it's important to maintain clean, well-structured HTML. This is crucial for the maintainability and scalability of your project. 

Commenting your HTML code is also a good practice, especially for larger projects or when working in teams.

And there you have it! You've successfully established the basic HTML structure for your rock-paper-scissors game. 

Let's keep up the momentum and enhance our JavaScript rock-paper-scissors game with CSS!

Step 3: Styling the Game With CSS

With our quiz app’s HTML structure ready, it's time to turn our attention to CSS to enhance the visual appeal and usability of our app.

With the HTML structure for our rock-paper-scissors game in place, it's time to elevate its visual appeal using CSS. 

This step will transform our basic layout into a stylish and engaging user interface. Let's infuse our game with some visual creativity!

i. Begin with Basic Styles

Open your style.css file. We'll start by setting some foundational styles to ensure our game looks inviting on any device:

body {
  font-family: 'Arial', sans-serif;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  height: 100vh;
  margin: 0;
  background: linear-gradient(to right, #56AB2F, #A8E063);
  color: #333;
}

#rps-game {
  width: 80%;
  max-width: 600px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  padding: 20px;
  background-color: #fff;
  border-radius: 10px;
  box-shadow: 0 4px 8px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1);
  text-align: center; /* Center the game content */
}

Try It Yourself »

In this section, we're:

  • Setting a universal font for a clean and consistent look.
  • Using Flexbox to center the game interface vertically and horizontally on the page.
  • Applying a full viewport height for the body to achieve a fullscreen effect.
  • Adding a gradient background for a modern look.
  • Defining the style for the main game container with padding, border-radius, and a box-shadow for a polished appearance.

ii. Style the Choice Buttons

Next, let's style the choice buttons for rock, paper, and scissors:

#choices button {
  padding: 15px 25px;
  background-color: #4CAF50;
  color: white;
  border: none;
  border-radius: 5px;
  cursor: pointer;
  font-size: 18px;
  margin: 10px;
  transition: background-color 0.3s;
}

#choices button:hover {
  background-color: #0056b3;
}

Try It Yourself »

Here, we're:

  • Styling the choice buttons with padding, border-radius, and a solid background color to make them stand out and be clickable.
  • Applying a hover effect to the buttons for better user interaction.

iii. Style the Results Display

Now, let's style the area where the game's result will be displayed:

#result {
  margin-top: 20px;
  font-size: 24px;
  font-weight: bold;
}

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In this section, we're:

  • Adding a margin to separate the result display from the choice buttons.
  • Increasing the font size and applying bold styling to make the result easily readable.

iv Save and Refresh

After adding these styles, save your style.css file. Refresh your browser to see the updated appearance. 

Your rock-paper-scissors game should now have a defined, interactive look that invites players to engage.

v. Experiment with Styles

Feel free to customize the styles further. Experiment with colors, fonts, spacing, and more to match your personal taste or brand identity.

And that's it! You've successfully enhanced your JavaScript rock-paper-scissors game, making it not only functional but also visually appealing and engaging for users.

Great work on completing this step. Next, we'll move on to the exciting part of our web development project – adding adding functionality with JavaScript.

Step 4: JavaScript - Initializing the Game

Now our Rock-Paper-Scissors game boasts an appealing design, it's time to infuse it with functionality using JavaScript. 

In this step, we'll lay the foundation for our game's logic and interactivity by initializing essential variables and setting up event listeners.

i. Start with Basic JavaScript Setup

Open your script.js file. We'll begin by defining variables that will interact with our HTML elements. Here's how to start:

const rockButton = document.getElementById('rock');
const paperButton = document.getElementById('paper');
const scissorsButton = document.getElementById('scissors');
const resultDisplay = document.getElementById('result');

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In this setup, we're:

  • Selecting the buttons for rock, paper, and scissors choices using their IDs.
  • Storing these elements in variables for straightforward access within our JavaScript code.
  • Selecting the element where the game's result will be displayed.

ii. Adding Event Listeners for Player Choices

Next, we need to handle the events when a player makes a choice. Here's how you can set up the event listeners:

rockButton.addEventListener('click', () => playRound('rock'));
paperButton.addEventListener('click', () => playRound('paper'));
scissorsButton.addEventListener('click', () => playRound('scissors'));

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In this setup, we're:

  • Attaching event listeners to each choice button.
  • Calling the playRound function with the player's choice as an argument when a button is clicked.

iii. Creating the Game Logic

Now, let's write the playRound function that will process the player's choice, generate the computer's choice, compare them, and update the game's result:

function playRound(playerChoice) {
  const choices = ['rock', 'paper', 'scissors'];
  const computerChoice = choices[Math.floor(Math.random() * choices.length)];
 
  // Determine the winner and update the resultDisplay with the outcome
  if (playerChoice === computerChoice) {
      resultDisplay.textContent = 'It\'s a draw!';
  } else if (
      (playerChoice === 'rock' && computerChoice === 'scissors') ||
      (playerChoice === 'paper' && computerChoice === 'rock') ||
      (playerChoice === 'scissors' && computerChoice === 'paper')
  ) {
      resultDisplay.textContent = 'You win!';
  } else {
      resultDisplay.textContent = 'Computer wins!';
  }
}

Try It Yourself »

In this function, we're:

  • Randomly generating the computer's choice.
  • Comparing the player's choice with the computer's to determine the outcome.
  • Updating the resultDisplay element to show whether the player won, lost, or drew the round.

iv. Testing Your Code

After implementing these features, save your script.js file and refresh your browser. 

Try choosing rock, paper, or scissors to see how the game responds. The result of each round should appear below the choice buttons, indicating the outcome of the game.

Congratulations! You've successfully initialized your JavaScript Rock-Paper-Scissors game with the core functionality. 

In the next steps, we'll enhance our game by adding features such as score tracking and a "best of" series option. 

Keep up the excellent work!

Step 5: JavaScript - Implementing Score Tracking

With the basic functionality of our rock-paper-scissors game established, it's time to add a scoring system to enhance the competitive element of the game. 

This step involves tracking the player's and computer's scores throughout the game and updating the score display after each round.

i. Setting Up Score Variables

Begin by declaring variables to keep track of the scores. Open your script.js file and add these lines:

let playerScore = 0;
let computerScore = 0;
const playerScoreDisplay = document.getElementById('player-score');
const computerScoreDisplay = document.getElementById('computer-score');

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In this function, we're:

  • Initializing playerScore and computerScore variables to track the scores.
  • Selecting the HTML elements where the player's and computer's scores will be displayed.

ii. Updating the playRound Function

Modify the playRound function to update the scores based on the round's outcome and then update the score display elements:

function playRound(playerChoice) {
  const choices = ['rock', 'paper', 'scissors'];
  const computerChoice = choices[Math.floor(Math.random() * choices.length)];

  if (playerChoice === computerChoice) {
      resultDisplay.textContent = 'It\'s a draw!';
  } else if (
      (playerChoice === 'rock' && computerChoice === 'scissors') ||
      (playerChoice === 'paper' && computerChoice === 'rock') ||
      (playerChoice === 'scissors' && computerChoice === 'paper')
  ) {
      resultDisplay.textContent = 'You win!';
      playerScore++; // Increment player's score
  } else {
      resultDisplay.textContent = 'Computer wins!';
      computerScore++; // Increment computer's score
  }

  // Update the score display
  playerScoreDisplay.textContent = `Player Score: ${playerScore}`;
  computerScoreDisplay.textContent = `Computer Score: ${computerScore}`;
}

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In this function, we're:

  • Incrementing the playerScore or computerScore based on the round's outcome.
  • Updating the score display elements with the current scores after each round.

iii. Adding a Score Display to the HTML

We want to ensure our HTML includes elements to display the scores, so let’s add this to our index.html file:

<div id="scoreboard">
  <div id="player-score">Player Score: 0</div>
  <div id="computer-score">Computer Score: 0</div>
</div>

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iv. Styling the Score Display

We can also add some CSS to make the score display visually appealing and easy to read:

#scoreboard {
  margin-top: 20px;
  font-size: 20px;
}

#player-score, #computer-score {
  margin: 10px;
}

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In this CSS, we're:

  • Adding a margin above the scoreboard for spacing.
  • Setting a font size for readability.
  • Adding margins around each score for clear separation.

v. Testing the Scoring System

After implementing the scoring system, save your changes and refresh the browser to test the game. 

Play several rounds to ensure that the scores are correctly incremented and displayed after each round.

Congratulations! You've now enhanced your rock-paper-scissors game with a scoring system, making it more engaging and competitive. 

This addition not only increases the game's replay value but also introduces players to fundamental concepts like variable manipulation and dynamic content updating in JavaScript.

Step 6: JavaScript - Enhancing Gameplay with Rounds

After adding score tracking to our rock-paper-scissors game, the next enhancement is to structure the game into a series of rounds. 

This will create a more structured gameplay experience, allowing players to play a set number of rounds before declaring a final winner.

i. Update the HTML Structure

Open your index.html file and add a new element to display the current round information. 

You might place it near the score display or the choice buttons, depending on your layout preference:

<div id="game-info">
  <div id="round">Round: 1 of 5</div>
  <!-- Existing score display elements -->
</div>

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In this update:

  • A new div with the ID round is added to display the current round and the total number of rounds.
  • This div is wrapped inside a game-info container along with any existing score displays for organizational purposes.

ii. Style the Round Display

You may also want to add some CSS to style the round display element, ensuring it fits well with the game's overall design:

#game-info {
  text-align: center;
  margin-bottom: 20px;
}

#round {
  font-size: 20px;
  margin: 10px 0;
}

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In this CSS:

  • The game-info container is styled to center its contents and provide some margin at the bottom.
  • The round element's font size is increased for better visibility, and a margin is added for spacing.

iii. Setting Up Round Variables

Begin by defining variables that will help manage the rounds within the game:

let currentRound = 1;
const totalRounds = 5; // You can adjust this number based on how long you want the game to be
const roundDisplay = document.getElementById('round');

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Here, we're:

  • Initializing currentRound to track the current round number.
  • Setting totalRounds to determine how many rounds will be played in total.
  • Selecting the HTML element where the current round will be displayed.

iv. Updating the playRound Function for Rounds

Modify the playRound function to include round management, updating the round information after each round, and checking if the game has reached the final round:

function playRound(playerChoice) {
    if (currentRound <= totalRounds) {
        // Existing playRound logic...
        // (Determining the winner of the round and updating scores)
 
        roundDisplay.textContent = `Round: ${currentRound} of ${totalRounds}`;
        currentRound++;
    }

    if (currentRound > totalRounds) {
        concludeGame(); // Call this function when all rounds are completed
    }
 }

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In this modification, we're:

  • Checking if the current round is within the total rounds allowed.
  • Updating the round information display after each round.
  • Incrementing the currentRound variable to progress through the game.
  • Calling a concludeGame function to handle the end of the game

v. Creating the concludeGame Function

Define a concludeGame function to display the final results and offer options for restarting the game:

function concludeGame() {
  let finalResult = '';

  if (playerScore > computerScore) {
      finalResult = 'Congratulations, you won the game!';
  } else if (playerScore < computerScore) {
      finalResult = 'Game over, the computer wins!';
  } else {
      finalResult = 'The game ends in a draw!';
  }

  resultDisplay.textContent = finalResult;
}

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In this function, we're:

  • Comparing the final scores to determine the winner.
  • Updating the resultDisplay with the final result message.

vi. Testing the Game with Rounds

After implementing the round system, save your changes and refresh the browser to test the updated game. 

Ensure that the game progresses through the specified number of rounds, updates round information correctly, and displays the final result at the end.

Congratulations! You've successfully structured your rock-paper-scissors game into a series of rounds, adding depth to the gameplay and creating a more engaging experience for players. 

This enhancement introduces players to more advanced JavaScript concepts like conditional logic and function organization.

Step 7: Displaying Results and Handling Game Conclusion

With the core gameplay and round system in place, let’s focus on finalizing the game by displaying results at the end of all rounds and providing an option for restarting the game. 

This step enhances the game's user experience by offering closure and replayability.

i. Enhancing the concludeGame Function

Expand the concludeGame function to provide a detailed summary of the game's outcome, including the final scores and a message indicating the winner. 

This function will be triggered after the last round is played:

function concludeGame() {
  // Reference to the main game container
  const gameContainer = document.getElementById('rps-game');

  // Hide the choices to clear the game area
  const choices = document.getElementById('choices');
  const gameInfo = document.getElementById('game-info');
  const roundRes = document.getElementById('result');
  if (choices) {
      choices.style.display = 'none';
  }

  if (gameInfo) {
      gameInfo.style.display = 'none';
  }

  if (roundRes) {
      roundRes.style.display = 'none';
  }

  // Create the game conclusion element
  const gameConclusion = document.createElement('div');
  gameConclusion.setAttribute('id', 'game-conclusion');

  let finalMessage = '';
  if (playerScore > computerScore) {
      finalMessage = 'Congratulations, you won the game!';
  } else if (playerScore < computerScore) {
      finalMessage = 'Game over, the computer wins!';
  } else {
      finalMessage = 'The game ends in a draw!';
  }

  gameConclusion.innerHTML = `
      <h2>Game Over</h2>
      <p>${finalMessage}</p>
      <p>Final Score - You: ${playerScore} | Computer: ${computerScore}</p>
      <button id="restart-btn">Restart Game</button>
  `;

  // Append the conclusion to the main game container
  gameContainer.appendChild(gameConclusion);

  // Add event listener to the restart button
  document.getElementById('restart-btn').addEventListener('click', restartGame);
}

Try It Yourself »

In this enhanced function, we're:

  • Creating a new div element to display the game's conclusion, including a final message and the final scores.
  • Hiding the round results, choice buttons, and game info elements for a cleaner look
  • Providing a "Restart Game" button within this div that allows the player to start a new game.

ii. Writing the restartGame Function

The restartGame function resets the game to its initial state, allowing players to play again from the beginning:

function restartGame() {
  playerScore = 0;
  computerScore = 0;
  currentRound = 1;

  // Reset score and round displays
  playerScoreDisplay.textContent = 'Player Score: 0';
  computerScoreDisplay.textContent = 'Computer Score: 0';
  roundDisplay.textContent = `Round: 1 of ${totalRounds}`;

  const choices = document.getElementById('choices');
  const gameInfo = document.getElementById('game-info');
  const roundRes = document.getElementById('result');
  if (choices) {
      choices.style.display = '';
  }

  if (gameInfo) {
      gameInfo.style.display = '';
  }

  if (roundRes) {
      roundRes.style.display = '';
  }

  // Remove the game conclusion display
  const gameConclusion = document.getElementById('game-conclusion');
  if (gameConclusion) {
      gameConclusion.remove();
  }

  // Ensure the game components are visible again if they were hidden
  document.getElementById('choices').style.display = '';
  resultDisplay.textContent = 'Choose your weapon!';
}

Try It Yourself »

In this function, we're:

  • Resetting the scores and current round to their initial values.
  • Updating the UI to reflect the reset state.
  • Resetting the display style for the elements we hid in the concludeGame function
  • Removing the game conclusion display from the previous game.
  • Making sure the choice buttons and initial game instructions are visible again.

iii. Testing the Game Conclusion and Restart Feature

After adding the result display and restart functionality, test the game thoroughly:

  • Play through the designated number of rounds to reach the game's conclusion and verify that the results are displayed correctly.
  • Click the "Restart Game" button to ensure the game resets properly, allowing for a new session to start seamlessly.

Congratulations! Your rock-paper-scissors game now includes a comprehensive conclusion phase! 

This enhances the overall experience by summarizing the game's outcome and offering players the option to restart. 

This final touch makes the game feel complete and allows continuous play.

Excellent work! We now have a fully functioning rock-paper-scissors game; let’s take a look at the final steps.

Step 8: Final Touches And Testing

Fantastic work on developing your JavaScript rock-paper-scissors game! 

Now, it's time to apply the finishing touches and rigorously test the application to ensure its functionality is flawless and the user experience is intuitive and engaging.

i. Review and Clean Up Code:

  • Carefully examine your JavaScript, HTML, and CSS files. Seek opportunities to refine or streamline your code to enhance readability and efficiency.
  • Maintain a consistent coding style, including proper indentation, use of quotes, and adherence to naming conventions, to improve code maintainability.
  • Eliminate any debugging remnants like console logs, commented-out code snippets, or unnecessary comments.

ii. Cross-Browser Testing:

  • Conduct tests on various web browsers to verify consistent performance and visual integrity of your rock-paper-scissors game. 
  • Address any compatibility issues, such as discrepancies in event listener behavior or CSS property support.
  • Utilize tools like BrowserStack or Can I Use for comprehensive testing and compatibility checks.

iii. Responsive Design Testing:

  • Test your rock-paper-scissors game on different devices or use browser tools to simulate various screen sizes, ensuring the UI is responsive and functional across devices.
  • Pay extra attention to how touch interactions work on mobile devices, confirming that taps are accurately registering as button presses.

iv. User Experience Enhancements:

  • Enhance interaction feedback, possibly by integrating subtle animations or transition effects for button presses to create a more dynamic interface.
  • Ensure the rock-paper-scissors game is accessible, considering aspects like keyboard navigation and clear visual cues for interactions.

v. Performance Optimization:

  • If your game includes any media or external resources, ensure they are optimized for swift loading without compromising on quality.
  • Review your resource usage and script executions to guarantee efficient loading and operation, contributing to an enhanced user experience.

vi. Gather Feedback:

  • If feasible, have others test your rock-paper-scissors game. Fresh perspectives might reveal overlooked issues or offer valuable insights into UX and design aspects.
  • Utilize this feedback to implement any necessary refinements to the app.

vii. Documentation and Sharing:

  • Consider drafting a README file if you plan to showcase your project on platforms like GitHub, detailing the project setup and any noteworthy features.
  • Share your project within developer communities or on social media to engage with a broader audience and gather additional feedback.

viii. Reflect and Plan Next Steps:

  • Reflect on the knowledge gained through this project and contemplate how these learnings can be applied to future endeavors.
  • Consider expanding your rock-paper-scissors game with more complex features, like sound effects, the ability for two players to compete, and visual animations.

Great job on building and refining your rock-paper-scissors game! Take a moment to appreciate your hard work!

Whether you're building this for fun, as a learning experience, or as a portfolio piece, you've developed valuable skills in programming, problem-solving, and user interface design.

Be proud of your work, share it with others, and consider what project you'll take on next!

Next Steps & Further Learning

Congratulations on successfully building your own interactive JavaScript rock-paper-scissors game!

This is a significant achievement, but your learning journey doesn't stop here. There are many ways to further your skills in web development. Let's explore some ideas:

Learn More About JavaScript and Web Technologies

  • JavaScript Enhancements: Explore more advanced JavaScript concepts and apply them to your app. Could advanced features like multiple-player options or sound effects be added? How about letting users choose how many rounds to play for?
  • Explore Frameworks: Experiment with JS frameworks like React, AngularJS, or Vue.js to see how they can be used to build more dynamic and complex web applications.
  • Web Animations: Learn about CSS animations and JavaScript to add engaging animations to your game.

Join Online Communities and Collaborate

  • Engage in Forums: Participate in web development forums and communities. Share your rock-paper-scissors game, get feedback, and learn from others.
  • Contribute to Open Source: Consider making your rock-paper-scissors game open-source and collaborate with others to improve it.

Keep Up with Trends and Best Practices

Stay updated with the latest trends in web development and JavaScript. Subscribe to blogs like hackr.io, watch webinars, and join online courses.

Document and Share Your Learning Journey

  • Blog About Your Project: Write about your development process, challenges you faced, and how you overcame them. Share your blog with the developer community.
  • Share Your Code: Publish your code on platforms like GitHub. This not only showcases your work but also allows others to learn from your project.

Challenge Yourself Regularly

Take part in coding challenges or hackathons to sharpen your skills and learn new techniques.

And if you're hungry for more JavaScript projects, check out the rest of our step-by-step tutorials, including:

JavaScript Rock, Paper, Scissors Game Full Source Code

HTML Source Code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
  <meta charset="UTF-8">
  <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
  <title>Rock-Paper-Scissors Game</title>
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css">
</head>
<body>
  <div id="rps-game">
      <h1>Rock-Paper-Scissors</h1>
      <div id="choices">
          <button id="rock">Rock</button>
          <button id="paper">Paper</button>
          <button id="scissors">Scissors</button>
      </div>
      <div id="result">
          <!-- Result will be displayed here -->
      </div>
      <div id="game-info">
          <div id="round">Round: 1 of 5</div>
          <div id="scoreboard">
              <div id="player-score">Player Score: 0</div>
              <div id="computer-score">Computer Score: 0</div>
          </div>
      </div>
  </div>
  <script src="script.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

Try It Yourself »

CSS Source Code:

body {
  font-family: 'Arial', sans-serif;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  height: 100vh;
  margin: 0;
  background: linear-gradient(to right, #56AB2F, #A8E063);
  color: #333;
}

#rps-game {
  width: 80%;
  max-width: 600px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  padding: 20px;
  background-color: #fff;
  border-radius: 10px;
  box-shadow: 0 4px 8px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1);
  text-align: center; /* Center the game content */
}

#choices button {
  padding: 15px 25px;
  background-color: #4CAF50;
  color: white;
  border: none;
  border-radius: 5px;
  cursor: pointer;
  font-size: 18px;
  margin: 10px;
  transition: background-color 0.3s;
}

#choices button:hover {
  background-color: #0056b3;
}

#result {
  margin-top: 20px;
  font-size: 24px;
  font-weight: bold;
}

#scoreboard {
  margin-top: 20px;
  font-size: 20px;
}

#player-score, #computer-score {
  margin: 10px;
}

#game-info {
  text-align: center;
  margin-bottom: 20px;
}

#round {
  font-size: 20px;
  margin: 10px 0;
}

Try It Yourself »

JavaScript Source Code:

const rockButton = document.getElementById('rock');
const paperButton = document.getElementById('paper');
const scissorsButton = document.getElementById('scissors');
const resultDisplay = document.getElementById('result');

rockButton.addEventListener('click', () => playRound('rock'));
paperButton.addEventListener('click', () => playRound('paper'));
scissorsButton.addEventListener('click', () => playRound('scissors'));

let playerScore = 0;
let computerScore = 0;
const playerScoreDisplay = document.getElementById('player-score');
const computerScoreDisplay = document.getElementById('computer-score');

let currentRound = 1;
const totalRounds = 5; // You can adjust this number based on how long you want the game to be
const roundDisplay = document.getElementById('round');

function playRound(playerChoice) {
    if (currentRound <= totalRounds) {

        roundDisplay.textContent = `Round: ${currentRound} of ${totalRounds}`;
        currentRound++;
        console.log(currentRound)

        const choices = ['rock', 'paper', 'scissors'];
        const computerChoice = choices[Math.floor(Math.random() * choices.length)];

        if (playerChoice === computerChoice) {
            resultDisplay.textContent = 'It\'s a draw!';
        } else if (
            (playerChoice === 'rock' && computerChoice === 'scissors') ||
            (playerChoice === 'paper' && computerChoice === 'rock') ||
            (playerChoice === 'scissors' && computerChoice === 'paper')
        ) {
            resultDisplay.textContent = 'You win!';
            playerScore++;
        } else {
            resultDisplay.textContent = 'Computer wins!';
            computerScore++;
        }

        playerScoreDisplay.textContent = `Player Score: ${playerScore}`;
        computerScoreDisplay.textContent = `Computer Score: ${computerScore}`;

    }
    
    if (currentRound > totalRounds) {
        concludeGame();
    }
}

function concludeGame() {
    const gameContainer = document.getElementById('rps-game');
    const choices = document.getElementById('choices');
    const gameInfo = document.getElementById('game-info');
    const roundRes = document.getElementById('result');
    if (choices) {
        choices.style.display = 'none';
    }

    if (gameInfo) {
        gameInfo.style.display = 'none';
    }

    if (roundRes) {
        roundRes.style.display = 'none';
    }

    const gameConclusion = document.createElement('div');
    gameConclusion.setAttribute('id', 'game-conclusion');

    let finalMessage = '';
    if (playerScore > computerScore) {
        finalMessage = 'Congratulations, you won the game!';
    } else if (playerScore < computerScore) {
        finalMessage = 'Game over, the computer wins!';
    } else {
        finalMessage = 'The game ends in a draw!';
    }

    gameConclusion.innerHTML = `
        <h2>Game Over</h2>
        <p>${finalMessage}</p>
        <p>Final Score - You: ${playerScore} | Computer: ${computerScore}</p>
        <button id="restart-btn">Restart Game</button>
    `;

    gameContainer.appendChild(gameConclusion);
    document.getElementById('restart-btn').addEventListener('click', restartGame);
}

function restartGame() {
    playerScore = 0;
    computerScore = 0;
    currentRound = 1;

    playerScoreDisplay.textContent = 'Player Score: 0';
    computerScoreDisplay.textContent = 'Computer Score: 0';
    roundDisplay.textContent = `Round: 1 of ${totalRounds}`;

    const choices = document.getElementById('choices');
    const gameInfo = document.getElementById('game-info');
    const roundRes = document.getElementById('result');
    if (choices) {
        choices.style.display = '';
    }

    if (gameInfo) {
        gameInfo.style.display = '';
    }

    if (roundRes) {
        roundRes.style.display = '';
    }

    const gameConclusion = document.getElementById('game-conclusion');
    if (gameConclusion) {
        gameConclusion.remove();
    }

    document.getElementById('choices').style.display = '';
    resultDisplay.textContent = 'Choose your weapon!';
}

Try It Yourself »

Wrapping Up

Building a rock-paper-scissors game using JavaScript HTML, and CSS is a great way to enhance your web development skills and delve into creating interactive web applications.

By creating this practical and fun app, you've tackled various challenges, including crafting a user-friendly interface, implementing game logic, and dynamically updating the webpage in response to player interactions. 

In this tutorial, you’ve learned how to:

  • Use HTML and CSS to design an attractive and intuitive interface for the Rock-Paper-Scissors game.
  • Write JavaScript to manage player choices, generate computer selections, and determine round outcomes.
  • Dynamically update HTML content with JavaScript to display current selections, scores, and round results.
  • React to user inputs by adding event listeners for the rock, paper, and scissors buttons.
  • Enhance gameplay with features like score tracking and managing a series of rounds to create a structured game session.

You now possess the essential skills and insights to further expand and refine this JavaScript rock-paper-scissors game. 

You might consider adding advanced features, such as user-defined rounds, animations, and sound effects, or integrate the quiz into a larger educational platform. 

Your journey into the world of JavaScript doesn't end here. With these new skills, you can experiment with more complex JavaScript projects, explore other aspects of JavaScript, and continue building fun and interactive web experiences.

And remember, you can do all this using our online JavaScript compiler, so get creative, have fun, and happy coding!

Want to sharpen up your JavaScript and web development skills? Check out:

Udemy's Top Rated Course: Java 17 Masterclass: Start Coding in 2024

By Robert Johns

Technical Editor for Hackr.io | 15+ Years in Python, Java, SQL, C++, C#, JavaScript, Ruby, PHP, .NET, MATLAB, HTML & CSS, and more... 10+ Years in Networking, Cloud, APIs, Linux | 5+ Years in Data Science | 2x PhDs in Structural & Blast Engineering

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